The Kosher Hub Home of all Things Jewish

The Kosher Hub Logo
Shavuot Table

The Shavuot Dinner

What does a typical Shavuot dinner look like?

Shavuot is a Jewish holiday that commemorates the giving of the Torah to the Jewish people at Mount Sinai.

A traditional way to celebrate Shavuot is by hosting a festive meal, also known as a Seudat Yom Tov. The following is a general outline of the order of a Shavuot dinner, along with some ideas for the type of food that might be served.

For a secular Jew, the order of the Shavuot dinner may vary depending on personal preferences and traditions, while for an Orthodox Jew, the order may follow more specific religious customs and laws.

  1. Kiddush: The dinner typically begins with Kiddush, a blessing recited over a cup of wine or grape juice to sanctify the holiday. The Kiddush must be recited before eating any food.

  2. Appetizers: A variety of dairy appetizers may be served, including cheese platters, quiches, dips, and salads.  Dairy dishes are commonly served as a reminder of the custom of eating dairy on Shavuot.

Want to understand What is Shavuot? Read our page on the basics of Shavuot and some of the most asked questions about this holiday.  What is Shavuot and most asked questions 

Shavuot Gingham table runner
Shavuot Gingham table runner
Happy Shavuot Table Runner
Happy Shavuot Table Runner
Shavuot Flower Table Runner
Shavuot Flower Table Runner
  1. Challah: Two loaves of challah bread are usually placed on the table and blessed before being sliced and passed around.

  2. Main Course: A main course of fish or spinach lasagne may be served, along with a variety of dairy sides such as blintzes, or kugel. 

  3. Dessert: Sweet treats such as cheesecake, rugelach, or ice cream are common for dessert. 

  4. Birkat Hamazon: After the meal, the group recites Birkat Hamazon, a blessing that thanks God for the food and the holiday.

The specific type of food served at a Shavuot dinner may vary depending on cultural traditions, and religious customs.  Additionally, the specific dishes served may vary depending on regional and cultural differences.

Overall, the focus of a Shavuot dinner is on celebrating the holiday with family and friends while enjoying delicious food and drink.

Go HERE to see some Shavuot Blintzes recipes 

Shavuot Serving Board
Shavuot Serving Board
Shavuot Kitchen Decor
Shavuot Kitchen Decor
Chag Shavuot Sameach Welcome Sign
Chag Shavuot Sameach Welcome Sign
Shavuot gingham apron
Shavuot gingham apron

Shavuot Challah

Shavuot challah can be different from Shabbat challah in a few ways, depending on the traditions and customs of different Jewish communities.

In some communities, it is customary to bake the Shavuot challah in the shape of a ladder or a set of tablets, as a reminder of the giving of the Torah on Mount Sinai. Other communities may add special ingredients to the challah dough, such as honey, to symbolize the sweetness of the Torah.

Another common difference is that Shavuot challah is often made with dairy ingredients, in contrast to Shabbat challah which is usually made without dairy. This is because the holiday of Shavuot is associated with the giving of the Torah, and the Torah is often compared to milk and honey.

However, it’s important to note that these differences are not universal, and the specific customs and traditions around Shavuot challah may vary depending on the Jewish community or family.

Shavuot Challah photo by Jewish Boston
Shavuot Challah photo by Jewish Boston
White Shavuot Dress

10 Shavuot Desserts

  1. Cheesecake: This is probably the most popular Shavuot dessert. It can be made with a graham cracker crust and topped with fresh fruit, chocolate, or caramel.

  2. Blintzes: Blintzes are thin, crepe-like pancakes that are filled with sweetened cheese, fruit, or jam. They can be served hot or cold, and are often topped with sour cream or fruit sauce.

  3. Rugelach: These are bite-sized, crescent-shaped pastries filled with chocolate, nuts, or fruit. They are flaky, buttery, and delicious.

  4. Kugel: This is a baked pudding made with noodles, cheese, and/or fruit. It can be sweet or savory, and is often served as a side dish or dessert.

  5. Tiramisu: This is an Italian dessert that is made with ladyfingers soaked in coffee and layered with a sweetened mascarpone cheese filling.

6. Babka: This is a sweet yeast cake that is swirled with chocolate or cinnamon. It is rich, decadent, and perfect for Shavuot.

7. Halva: This is a sweet confection made from sesame seeds and honey or sugar. It has a nutty, slightly crunchy texture, and is often served with coffee or tea.

8. Fruit Tart: This is a pastry crust filled with custard or cream and topped with fresh fruit. It can be made with a variety of fruits, such as strawberries, kiwi, and blueberries.

9. Chocolate Truffles: These are small, bite-sized balls of chocolate that are rolled in nuts or cocoa powder. They are rich, creamy, and perfect for chocolate lovers.

10. Apple Strudel: This is a sweet pastry filled with apples, raisins, and cinnamon. It can be served warm or cold, and is often served with whipped cream or ice cream.

White Shavuot Post Card
White Shavuot Post Card
White Shavuot Scarf
White Shavuot Scarf
White Shavuot Mini Skirt
White Shavuot Mini Skirt
White Shavuot Coasters
White Shavuot Coasters

You might also be interested in our other Shavuot articles